What to Know Before Moving
a Parent Home with You

home selling articles and tips

 

For many, bringing an older parent into the home is just a natural part of getting older. As they took care of you when you were a child, you will now provide a place for them to live as they get older. This isn't always an easy process, though, and you'll need to prepare. Below are a few things you consider before your parent moves in with you. 

Mobility Issues

How well does your parent get around? While this might seem like a minor issue on its face, what you'll really be dealing with is figuring out how you'll need to change your home before they move in. If your parent can't handle stairs, for example, you'll want to consider making sure they have a room on the bottom floor - or that you have the ability to add a mobility system to your home. Your parent's ability to move around your current home will play a huge role in the preparations you need to make.

Health and Healthcare

What is your parent's health like? Do they have any special health needs? If so, are you prepared to deal with those problems, or will you have to hire a professional? This is not only an issue of health for your parent, but also of your financial ability to provide care for them. You'll need to consider issues of health insurance as well, especially if there are long-term issues to deal with. Caring for an aging parent can be expensive, but it can be even more problematic if you do not prepare before they move into your home. 

Mental Health

Your aging parent might have only minor physical health issues, but deteriorating mental health can be just as hard to manage on your own. If you notice symptoms of dementia, it might be worth it to consider alternative mental or dementia care. People can come into your home, and if symptoms worsen, professional facilities might have more equipment and knowledge to help you.

Social Needs and Time

It's also important to consider your parent's social needs before moving them in. How reliant will they be on your for transportation, for example? What about socialization? Will they be moving far away from friends or family? All these questions will have a huge role on your parent's mental state, and will certainly weigh on your relationship. It may be a good idea to look into a senior center for socialization needs, especially if moving into an entirely new area. 

This may be a tough transition for you and your parents, but you can make things easier by preparing. If you are willing to ask the tough questions, you can make sure you're ready for your parent to come to your home. With a little preparation, you can make your house into a home that suits the needs of your entire family.